free-leonard-peltier
free-leonard-peltier:

First Nations back away from squatters asserting aboriginal title
CANADIAN PRESS , JULY 21, 2014,
VANCOUVER – Squatters given eviction notices for camping in a Vancouver park claim they have a right to put down stakes because they’re on unceded land, but three local First Nations whose territory they’re occupying are distancing themselves from the protest.
The City of Vancouver issued two eviction notices in recent days to a group of people who have built a fire pit and put up about a dozen tents — including a teepee — in Oppenheimer Park.
Audrey Siegl, who was at the Downtown Eastside park to show her support, said a handful of the campers have been living there for months because they are homeless. However, more people have moved in since the eviction notices were issued to protest against homelessness in the city.
Siegl, of the Musqueam First Nation, said many of the homeless campers are aboriginal and have nowhere else to go, and the city can’t force them out because the park is on unceded Coast Salish territory.
“We’ve never given this away, we’ve never signed this away, we’ve never sold this away,” she said. “This city is born on our cultural, our ancestral sites.”
Sarah Thomas, a spokeswoman for the Tsleil Waututh Nation, said Oppenheimer Park is considered unceded traditional territory of the Tsleil Waututh, Musqueam and Squamish First Nations, but protesters who are asserting aboriginal title are doing so individually and don’t represent their nations.

free-leonard-peltier:

First Nations back away from squatters asserting aboriginal title

CANADIAN PRESS , JULY 21, 2014,

VANCOUVER – Squatters given eviction notices for camping in a Vancouver park claim they have a right to put down stakes because they’re on unceded land, but three local First Nations whose territory they’re occupying are distancing themselves from the protest.

The City of Vancouver issued two eviction notices in recent days to a group of people who have built a fire pit and put up about a dozen tents — including a teepee — in Oppenheimer Park.

Audrey Siegl, who was at the Downtown Eastside park to show her support, said a handful of the campers have been living there for months because they are homeless. However, more people have moved in since the eviction notices were issued to protest against homelessness in the city.

Siegl, of the Musqueam First Nation, said many of the homeless campers are aboriginal and have nowhere else to go, and the city can’t force them out because the park is on unceded Coast Salish territory.

“We’ve never given this away, we’ve never signed this away, we’ve never sold this away,” she said. “This city is born on our cultural, our ancestral sites.”

Sarah Thomas, a spokeswoman for the Tsleil Waututh Nation, said Oppenheimer Park is considered unceded traditional territory of the Tsleil Waututh, Musqueam and Squamish First Nations, but protesters who are asserting aboriginal title are doing so individually and don’t represent their nations.

lastrealindians

jeast12 asked:

Why would redskins be offensive? .iam literally half Indian Apache my grandmother full biological grandmother at that she born in 1932 see to offense nor related full blood family ....I.a also African American and yes we are still labled as "blacks"

lastrealindians answered:

The term ‘redskin’ doesn’t merely refer to a red complexion. It’s a racial slur. Look it up in the dictionary. The term was also used to describe the skinning of Native men, women and children, and also the selling of those skins for a bounty. States like Minnesota paid white settlers money for Native scalps. Frankly, I’m hard pressed to think of anything more repulsive.

mini-girlz
mini-girlz:

Standing Figures

Culture: Possibly Mimbres, Native American
Medium: Stone, pigment
Place Collected: Sanders, Arizona, United States
Dates: 1100-1000 B.C.E.
Dimensions: 3 x 1 3/4 x 3/4 in. (7.6 x 4.4 x 1.9 cm) 
These eight figurines were found inside a ceramic vessel near Sanders, Arizona, but the context of the discovery site is unknown. Their facial features, thin arms, and angular postures point to a Mimbres origin. Similar stone figurines have been discovered in the region in a variety of archaeological contexts, including a burial, a domestic room, and a trash mound. The open mouths suggest some form of communication, and the objects’ small size indicates personal use, but questions remain: Were the objects used for rituals or burial offerings, or as treasured possessions? Were they discarded after one use? 
via > brooklynmuseum.org

mini-girlz:

Standing Figures

Culture: Possibly Mimbres, Native American

Medium: Stone, pigment

These eight figurines were found inside a ceramic vessel near Sanders, Arizona, but the context of the discovery site is unknown. Their facial features, thin arms, and angular postures point to a Mimbres origin. Similar stone figurines have been discovered in the region in a variety of archaeological contexts, including a burial, a domestic room, and a trash mound. The open mouths suggest some form of communication, and the objects’ small size indicates personal use, but questions remain: Were the objects used for rituals or burial offerings, or as treasured possessions? Were they discarded after one use? 

via > brooklynmuseum.org